Grammar Gazette: Commonly Misused Words

Photo by Kai Chan Vong https://www.flickr.com/photos/kaichanvong/2935199606/in/photolist-5tnEzL-YpjXU-96L9KD-cie6bm-7MxXT7-6iW8su-sgta9Y-cwmkS3-ctXQVA-nwwDvu-ewWXyU-d1MuLf-fGa6r-bWnKws-nLZkSE-bWnKDL-9sbeEB-KeGHZ-8a8Dim-a5ZFZr-fEkRPj-4esS1-bBDU4R-dcn7A-fRZfzy-895saL-dyH1Va-8mhV4u-7DDB58-7LJANk-dU4zLn-bndbmn-Qyb5dY-5HSmrh-5CG8qp-6EKWcF-BmQ21-ohVjup-7sejhF-o1mrWs-cYsZQU-a1NdV7-abRCJM-dmNNe8-cibXEo-bBDTbT-ki82f-dyH1Sz-x9Ds6-kUQMQF
Photo by
Kai Chan Vong

Words! For editors and writers, they’re the tools of the trade. But like any tool, they can be misused. Some improperly used terms come up more often than others, though—here are some repeat offenders.

While clamber means to climb up, clamor means to yell or make a noise. So remember, children won’t clamber for a particular book—they’ll clamor.

A book can have a foreword and an afterword—not a forward or an afterward.

We might compliment a writer for doing a great job on a piece, but we would note that the artwork of a book complements the text.

Kids will pore over the images of a book, not pour.

Save

Leave a Reply