The Deal with VERDICTs: SLJ Reviewer Chat Transcript, March 30, 2016

Below is the transcript to our last SLJ Reviewer Chat, which focused on fine-tuning review verdicts, and was held on March 30 via a new platform. To access a cleaner, and prettier version, feel free to log in to your Slack account and check out the SLJ Reviewer Chat channel.

Plus, check out a recent example of a pretty awesome verdict:

Some of our recent reviewers have done some truly excellent work when it comes to crafting a verdict that’s enlightening and fun to read. In a recent review of a YA book on cults, Suzanne Gordon wrote, “This attempt at gritty outsider realistic fiction is unlikely to draw converts.”

sdiaz101

2:57 PM Hello everyone! our reviewer chat is starting in a few minutes! Feel free to say hello and say where you’re from!

mkozikowski

2:57 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

jennie_rothschild

2:58 PM Hi! I’m Jennie from Arlington, VA

jtlibrarian

2:58 PM Hi from Chicago where March is going out like a lion.

eholt13

2:58 PM Hi I’m Erin from TN

mahnaz

2:58 PM hi!

mkozikowski

2:59 PM Hi, I’m Marybeth Kozikowski, from Long Island in NY State, on a gorgeous sunny afternoon.

sdiaz101

2:59 PM I’m Shelley Diaz, SLJ reviews manager

kparrott

3:00 PM :wave: Hi everyone. I’m Kiera, reviews director.

sljdvds

3:00 PM Hi. I’m Kent Turner. I edit the DVD reviews

sdiaz101

3:00 PM I edit YA reviews and bilingual

mkozikowski

3:00 PM I’m on the reference desk during this so I apologize in advance if some answers sound disjointed (darn patrons!)

dfarrell

3:00 PM Hello! I am Della Farrell, nonfiction editor

sdiaz101

3:00 PM @mkozikowski: who do they think they are?!

jtlibrarian

3:00 PM Ditto Marybeth’s circumstance.

mdesharn

3:00 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

sdiaz101

3:01 PM Welcome to first-ever slj reviewer chat via Slack. I hope you’re finding the new platform fun to use.

ilovespicturebooks

3:01 PM I’m Luann Toth. I assign and edit picture books.

sdiaz101

3:01 PM I really like that you can download as an app as well!

hwrittsljatsullivan

3:01 PM Hello. This is Hilary from Lexington.

friende

3:01 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

mdesharn

3:01 PM Hi! I’m Miriam in Baltimore.

eholt13

3:01 PM Slack just an app or can u use it on the computer too?

mahnaz

3:01 PM I’m Mahnaz Dar, I assign adult bks 4 teens and graphic novels!

friende

3:01 PM Liz from Frisco, Texas.

sdiaz101

3:02 PM @eholt13: you can use it on the computer too!

sarahw

3:02 PM Sarah in Cleveland OH

sdiaz101

3:02 PM Here’s a link to the full transcript of our previous reviewer chat on Middle School vs. high School: http://contributors.slj.com/2016/03/middle-school-vs-high-school-transcript-from-february-24-reviewer-chat/

nromanobraham

3:03 PM Hi there! I’m Natalie in Denver, CO

sdiaz101

3:03 PM Welcome, welcome!

ilovespicturebooks

3:03 PM So, what’s the verdict on verdicts? Do you as users like them and find them useful?

sdiaz101

3:03 PM Today, we’re discussing VERDICTs: How to craft them, why they are so important, and what makes a strong VERDICT. SLJ has incorporated VERDICTs in our reviews for over a year now, and we could all use a refresher.

3:04

Have you as librarians found them useful?

mkozikowski

3:04 PM I think they crystallize the reviewers thoughts; I look forward to them

sarahw

3:04 PM As a selector, I love verdicts

hwrittsljatsullivan

3:04 PM Yes, I find them helpful, however, I’m still learning how to write them.

sdiaz101

3:04 PM @mkozikowski: great! good to hear

3:05

@hwrittsljatsullivan: Yes, I think it has been a learning process for us editors as well

jtlibrarian

3:05 PM This verdict element is new since I’ve been away.

jennie_rothschild

3:05 PM I love them when I’m doing collection development. Less when I’m writing the review!

nromanobraham

3:05 PM I find them useful when I read book reviews; however, I am still learning how to incorporate them into my own reviews.

sdiaz101

3:05 PM Here’s our official document about verdicts.  http://contributors.slj.com/2015/04/the-verdict/

lacosta

3:06 PM I’m new at this, so looking forward to hearing what others have to say

sdiaz101

3:06 PM Looking back at some of the examples we provided, I noticed that there are some verdicts that are stronger than others. One in particular, is an example of a sentence that makes a good intro to the review, but doesn’t necessarily tell the audience “Buy this book” or “Skip this book.”
A standout science fiction title with an action-packed storyline.

meganm

3:06 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

eholt13

3:06 PM I love the verdicts

meganm

3:06 PM Hello All!

kparrott

3:07 PM Err, uh, yeah. that would be my fault, @sdiaz101 . I came up with those examples very early on in the process. Not all of them are all that great, looking back.

sdiaz101

3:07 PM Essentially, Verdicts should answer these two questions: Should I buy this buy? If so, for whom?

kparrott

3:07 PM But, ya live, ya learn.

sarahw

3:07 PM when I think about other librarians deciding whether or not to purchase the book for their collections, they aren’t so hard to write…at least that’s the bottom line criteria I use when writing verdicts

jenna_friebel

3:07 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

meganm

3:07 PM I also love the verdicts!

sdiaz101

3:07 PM No worries, @kparrott! It’s all a work in progress

3:07

:simple_smile:

mkozikowski

3:07 PM I

mahnaz

3:07 PM :simple_smile:

jennie_rothschild

3:08 PM Sometimes, I think of it as “if I only had 1 tweet to review this book, what would I say”

kparrott

3:08 PM Ideally, a verdict should have ​some​ sort of evaluative statement that builds upon what your review articulated in more detail.

mahnaz

3:08 PM That’s a good way of putting it, @jennie_rothschild

jennie_rothschild

3:08 PM And sometimes I start with the verdict, and then write the rest of review

nromanobraham

3:08 PM One thing I try to think about, especially as a children’s librarian who does storytime on a regular basis, is whether or not the book is a good choice for storytime/read-aloud. However, it’s still a challenge for me to communicate that in my reviews without saying “buy this!”

sdiaz101

3:09 PM Exactly! And it isn’t just a summary of the book. It’s whether a librarian should buy. If so, for whom?

kparrott

3:09 PM So, if I were to redo that bad verdict Shelley mentioned, I’d change from “A standout science fiction title with an action-packed storyline.” to something like “A standout science fiction title with an action-packed storyline, perfect for younger middle grade readers not quite ready for the Hunger Games.”

bstaszak

3:09 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

kparrott

3:09 PM That’s a really good idea, @jennie_rothschild. I may need to try that myself next time.

sdiaz101

3:10 PM The way I would tweak  “A standout science fiction title with an action-packed storyline.” is as follows: A standout title for YA sci-fi collections; or “Recommended for collections seeking standout sci-fi titles”

bstaszak

3:10 PM Sorry I’m late! Brittany from Chicagoland :0)

sdiaz101

3:10 PM Yes, I like that @kparrott

mahnaz

3:10 PM hiya @bstaszak !

jtlibrarian

3:10 PM What about those gray areas when its goods for  when its only good for schools or large collections.

dfarrell

3:11 PM The Verdict should consider the larger context of the collection, it might be a good title but how does it fair against other books in that subject area

tamara

3:11 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

dfarrell

3:11 PM Yes! @jtlibrarian

jenna_friebel

3:11 PM How do you differentiate between what to say as your opening sentence of the review, and what to have as the verdict? I don’t want to be redundant.

tamara

3:11 PM Hello, sorry I am late. Still figuring out the new app.

mdesharn

3:11 PM As a purchaser I also like if a review gives me a sense of if a book is “nice to have for larger collections” or “a must buy for all libraries of your type across the universe.” Many books are good on their own terms, which is a fair way to review them, but might not make the cut for a collection like mine which is small.

sdiaz101

3:11 PM @jtlibrarian: Good point! I would say just that, then. Recommended for large collections

mahnaz

3:12 PM @jenna_friebel: a topic sentence can be a bit more general. some of the “bad” verdicts we mentioned could even make good topic sentences

kparrott

3:12 PM When I was a librarian, if I read that a title was “good for larger collections”, to me that was code for, don’t waste your money on this–it’s okay but not essential.

alea_p

3:12 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

sdiaz101

3:12 PM @jenna_friebel: A good intro sentence often is a general summary of the book, so that readers know the tenor of what your review is going to say

laura.simeon

3:13 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

mdesharn

3:13 PM kparrott, I agree :simple_smile:

sdiaz101

3:13 PM They can often be a phrase even: “A standout sci-fi title”

dfarrell

3:13 PM I think it is also valuable to note what area the title is suited for, an example of this would be, “This excellent title is recommended for any collection in need of quality creative nonfiction in the area of natural history.”

heidirab

3:13 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

sdiaz101

3:14 PM And the verdict would in turn be: A must-have work for teen collections.

bstaszak

3:14 PM In my verdicts, I try to sum up the book genre and merit-wise and place it, a lot like the revised verdict @kparrott posted above. Even if I loved a book a thought it was great (or, alternatively, hated it…), I know some books will work for some communities and not for others and try to make that the point instead of and overall “buy!” or “do not buy!”.

3:14

Unless of course I think ALL libraries should or shouldn’t buy something, then I’ll say that :0)

mkozikowski

3:14 PM I appreciate a verdict that adds a broader point  about the book’s use or audience  i.e. ‘larger format for storytelling’ or ‘ideal as a read-aloud’.

kparrott

3:14 PM @jenna_friebel: So an intro sentence might be something like “A rip-roaring, laugh-out-loud sci-fi adventure set in a futuristic Cincinnati.” The verdict for that review might be “This funny new sci-fi series starter is a solid purchase, especially where readers can’t get enough Douglas Adams.” Or something like that.

sdiaz101

3:14 PM Right, @bstaszak !

mahnaz

3:15 PM yes, helping readers figure out how to use the bk is really key, too

ashepherd

3:15 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

jtlibrarian

3:15 PM Clarifying the genre makes a lot sense.

sdiaz101

3:16 PM It’s important for us to remember how diverse SLJ reviews readers are: collection dev librarians for a big system to a lone school librarian in the middle of nowhere

laura.simeon

3:16 PM The verdicts I find hard to write are negative ones. How do you more creatively say “not recommended for purchase” or “an additional purchase” given that your review already covered all the problems with the title?

sljdvds

3:16 PM @jtlibrarian: Many DVD verdicts will be recommended for public library collections as opposed to school libraries, often because of content

tamara

3:16 PM @bstaszak: I agree.  Reviewed a book recently on a Native American woman.  I stated it was good for larger collections or for collections that want a more in-depth native american collection.  We are surrounded by reservations out here, so in my state it might be added just because of that.

jenna_friebel

3:16 PM @laura.simeon: Last time I had that, I recommended an alternate, similar title instead in the verdict.

mahnaz

3:17 PM That’s a good suggestion, @jenna_friebel

sdiaz101

3:17 PM I like that approach @jenna_friebel

tamara

3:17 PM I 2nd @mahnaz

ilovespicturebooks

3:18 PM No one can possibly afford to buy all of the picture books that we review. Readers should come away knowing if its a fit for their readers and has programming potential.

laura.simeon

3:18 PM @jenna_friebel: thanks! Looking back on my most recent review, I recommended a better title in the body of the review, but could have made that the verdict.

sdiaz101

3:18 PM We try to be more creative than “An additional purchase” or “Not Recommended” It’s hard, I know

3:19

For a super cheesy paranormal romance, I would say: “Only for avid paranormal romance fans”

ernie_cox

3:20 PM other reviews use the “additional purchase” message but it seems confusing to me…what library can afford an additional purchase?

mahnaz

3:20 PM Something like “for die-hard fans of the author/genre/etc.” is a nice way of letting folks know that it’s really not for everyone

mkozikowski

3:20 PM “additional purchase” to me is a polite “kiss of death”…similar to “for larger collections” but harsher.

sdiaz101

3:20 PM you’re right, @ernie_cox!

3:21

Here’s an example of verdict for a series title: “This title doesn’t stand alone, but is a must-read for fans of the first book.”

dfarrell

3:21 PM I agree @mkozikowski

sdiaz101

3:21 PM Or you could say, “Purchase where the previous volume flies of the shelf.” :simple_smile:

wr_cherry

3:21 PM Sorry all…playing a little catch up real fast

sdiaz101

3:22 PM No worries! Welcome @wr_cherry

tara

3:22 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

tara

3:22 PM Is a two sentence VERDICT OK?

sdiaz101

3:23 PM Good question, @tara. I think it’s okay, as long as they’re both to the point

3:23

A verdict that is half the size of the review is a no-no

eholt13

3:23 PM Did we get answer if the verdict counts in our overall word count for the review? I have been counting it

tara

3:23 PM Thanks!

sdiaz101

3:23 PM Ahhh! @eholt13 thanks for the reminder

wr_cherry

3:24 PM I struggled with the 2 sentence verdict too…glad to see that’s acceptable

sdiaz101

3:24 PM Yes, Verdicts do count as part of the final 250 word count

eholt13

3:24 PM Thx

hwrittsljatsullivan

3:24 PM Thank you for the word on verdicts and word count!

kparrott

3:24 PM Though…and this may be a topic for another chat…I’m a fan of short and sweet. There may come a time in the near future where we tighten up word counts a bit.

sdiaz101

3:24 PM But if you run over, the editors can help cut it down

mahnaz

3:25 PM that’s what we’re here for :simple_smile:

eholt13

3:25 PM Yeah LJ word counts are 175-200

kparrott

3:25 PM But yeah, don’t sweat the word count. As @sdiaz101 says, that’s why there are editors!

wr_cherry

3:25 PM I struggle with that oo :wink:

3:25

too*

eholt13

3:25 PM So 250 feels long lol

sdiaz101

3:25 PM Let’s try our best to be succint; I’m also a fan of semi colons (;) !!!

eholt13

3:25 PM I go over my count too lol

heidirab

3:26 PM There’s a word count? LOL, I’ve been writing SLJ reviews so long, maybe I got here before word counts and nobody ever told me. But since no one has told me my reviews are too long, I guess it’s ok.

jennie_rothschild

3:26 PM Bless the editors. I once submitted a review and in the notes field wrote ” I know this is way too long. I don’t know what to cut. HELP!”

kparrott

3:26 PM I’m with ya, @eholt13. Librarians don’t have a lot of time to read long reviews. Sometimes a review warrants a slightly longer treatment. But I think most can be done in about 200 words.

mahnaz

3:26 PM yes hurray for semicolons

sdiaz101

3:26 PM It’s better to say more than less. And then the editors can step in and tweak where needed

tamara

3:26 PM I usually start w/ 300 to 350 word reviews, and have to edit like crazy before sending it in.

alea_p

3:26 PM When reading reviews, I look at the verdict first, then the second part, then the summary at the beginning if I have time.

nromanobraham

3:26 PM @tamara

eholt13

3:27 PM I’m notorious for writing a novella in the notes section ha

mahnaz

3:27 PM and i agree, @kparrott — sometimes using fewer words takes more time, but it really helps you craft an efficient piece

nromanobraham

3:27 PM oops sorry. @tamara: I feel the same way

eholt13

3:27 PM Yes @alea_p  me too

wr_cherry

3:27 PM @alea_p: Me too…I work by myself and I don’t have time to do anything it seems

knappm

3:27 PM joined #slj-reviewer-chat

tara

3:27 PM Thanks for the word count reminder!  I too LOVE the VERDICT when reading reviews.

sdiaz101

3:27 PM Yes, @alea_p. I think many of our readers do that too

jenna_friebel

3:27 PM @alea_p: yep I’m definitely the same way

kparrott

3:27 PM Another piece of advice on Verdicts: I always like to say that they shouldn’t come as a surprise. The review itself should function as evidence for the Verdict.

ilovespicturebooks

3:27 PM We read all of the notes avidly. Thanks.

sdiaz101

3:27 PM It’s the sad truth of the amount of work librarians have to do in short amount of time

3:28

So that’s why verdicts should be useful and help our readers do their jobs as quickly as possible.

eholt13

3:28 PM @kparrott: I agree the whole thing should be fluid

sdiaz101

3:28 PM I :heart: notes!

mahnaz

3:28 PM Yes, no twist endings here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ernie_cox

3:28 PM I really appreciate the verdicts that reference read alikes

eholt13

3:28 PM Ha @sdiaz101 :heart:

kparrott

3:29 PM The feedback we get from our readers is the same, @ernie_cox. They love getting readalike (or even “read instead”) recs.

mahnaz

3:29 PM esp when there are so many books on a given topic

sdiaz101

3:29 PM Yes, readalikes can tell me exactly who this book is for, and even how many copies I should purchase

mahnaz

3:29 PM there are a lot of bks on say sports…what makes this one different from the rest? and if it’s not terribly diff, readers need to know that

wadhambooks

3:30 PM What about “meets” verdicts?  Superman v. Batman meets The Fault in our Stars? (edited)

ernie_cox

3:30 PM will we offer verdicts for professional titles too?

3:30

I want to read that one @wadhambooks !

wr_cherry

3:30 PM Wouldn’t “meets” be better in the opening or summary?

mahnaz

3:30 PM @ernie_cox: professional reading titles do have verdicts

sdiaz101

3:30 PM I think super thoughtful readalikes are also helpful. Not every book is Eleanor & Park

laura.simeon

3:31 PM Have to leave to meet with a student who is starting her own book blog. Thanks for the great insights – very helpful!

mahnaz

3:31 PM bye @laura.simeon :simple_smile:

laura.simeon

3:31 PM :simple_smile:

sdiaz101

3:31 PM That sounds awesome, @laura.simeon

dfarrell

3:31 PM thanks for joining @laura.simeon

sljdvds

3:31 PM @wadhambooks: I like “meets” as a way of describing a book

dfarrell

3:31 PM :simple_smile:

kparrott

3:32 PM @wadhambooks: I agree with @wr_cherry and @sljdvds. I think the “meets” convention works a bit stronger as an intro sentence.

dfarrell

3:32 PM “meets” is a great attention grabber

mkozikowski

3:32 PM Not sure I’m a fan of “meets” comparisons; I may not get what connection you see.

ilovespicturebooks

3:33 PM It says that the book is not terribly original to me.

dfarrell

3:33 PM exactly @mkozikowski

mahnaz

3:33 PM they are admittedly a bit overdone

wr_cherry

3:33 PM It got me to buy Jackaby…Sherlock meets Doctor Who

sljdvds

3:33 PM I think “meets” works best in the body of the review

alea_p

3:33 PM For editors: are there any practices you see a lot of/frequently that you think reviewers should steer clear of with verdicts?

sdiaz101

3:33 PM I think as long as the rest of the review provides context, then the “meets” comparison can work

jenna_friebel

3:34 PM sometimes “meets” feels gimmicky to me– too much what the publishers use to ​sell​ books.

mahnaz

3:34 PM @alea_p: I think verdicts that are too general can be a problem…like it might sum up or describe the bk but without really taking a point of view

kparrott

3:34 PM I think it depends on the book–and the ‘what’ meets ‘what.’ Sometimes they can be very original and a truly unique mashup. But I do here a lot of library marketing folks overusing the “meets” phrase. I was once as a preview where someone used 3 (3!). As in X meets X meets X. :face_with_rolling_eyes:

meganm

3:34 PM I feel like the meets is subjective to the reader.

sdiaz101

3:34 PM Yes, we want to be wary of sounding too much like publisher  marketing copy

kparrott

3:34 PM *hear

wadhambooks

3:34 PM @ilovespicturebooks: my thought exactly, but since we are all dipping from the same cauldron of story, what stories are original anyway?

wr_cherry

3:34 PM I agree with that @sdiaz101

mkozikowski

3:34 PM agreed, jenna

mahnaz

3:35 PM also words to steer clear of in verdicts (and everywhere)…unique and interesting

dfarrell

3:35 PM @alea_p:  going back to what @kparrott mentioned earlier the verdict should reflect the content and tone of the review. if the review mentions problematic elements of a book the verdict needs to reflect that

alea_p

3:35 PM Thanks, @mahnaz

kparrott

3:35 PM That’s very existential, @wadhambooks. Is LITERATURE dead? Is nothing new? (sorry, total sidebar… lol)

ernie_cox

3:35 PM Sighing off –  I have bus duty ….thanks for the chat

sdiaz101

3:35 PM I would love to reiterate what @mahnaz said: Don’t be afraid to take a stand!

eholt13

3:35 PM Thx @mahnaz

sljdvds

3:35 PM @alea_p: For verdicts, be on the lookout if it’s really just a summary, as in ““A fine production capturing the era.” That one doesn’t say who the audience may be

wr_cherry

3:36 PM I’m always nervous when I write less than glowing reviews, especially in the verdit

3:36

verdict*

kparrott

3:36 PM Thanks @ernie_cox!

wr_cherry

3:36 PM I just don’t want a “nasty” email from a publisher or somethin

3:36

something*…gosh I think my keyboard is on strike

tamara

3:36 PM Signing out.  Need to go into work.  Thanks for all the tips. . .

wadhambooks

3:36 PM @kparrott: I didn’t get a Ph.D in comparative literature for nothing…

sdiaz101

3:36 PM I know it’s difficult because your byline is there, but readers are counting on your “verdict” :wink:

3:36

If you get any nasty emails from publishers, feel free to direct them to me

kparrott

3:37 PM This is a great time to remind everyone that if you do ever get a nasty email, tweet, etc. from an author or publisher, don’t respond. Immediately let your editor know.

sdiaz101

3:37 PM Here’s a really helpful post that kparrott wrote about writing “bad” reviews: http://contributors.slj.com/2015/05/writing-a-bad-review/

sljdvds

3:37 PM Another verdict that is more a summary: “Viewers are likely to be motivated to listen to the natural world around them, and to protect it.”

sdiaz101

3:37 PM sdiaz@mediasourceinc.com :simple_smile:

kparrott

3:38 PM That said, I hesitate to think of reviews as good or bad–but rather, honest. If it’s a bad book, as long as you describe why and give a few concrete examples, publishers can be as mad as they want. But we have a right–and obligation–to be honest in our reviews. And us editors will stand behind you 100%.

sdiaz101

3:39 PM Yes, and think about the reader who this book is for, maybe not necessarily your students or patrons, but the one kid that this book would make a different to

3:39

difference*

mahnaz

3:39 PM here’s a good verdict a reviewer turned in recently: Fans of Margo Lanagan and Adam Rapp will be entranced by Tempest’s brutally modern prose and her tender understanding of young people coming of age in an unforgiving world.

kparrott

3:40 PM Ooo. That’s is a good one.

wr_cherry

3:40 PM wow

dfarrell

3:40 PM so much there!

mahnaz

3:40 PM and a good example of a two-sentence verdict that i think works: Teens looking for graphic details would do better with titles such as Vincent Bugliosi’s Helter Skelter. But those seeking to understand how life continues after a grave loss will love Kushner’s eloquent words and personal viewpoint.

kparrott

3:40 PM NICE

mahnaz

3:41 PM Our adult bks 4 teens columnists really hit it out of the park this week :simple_smile:

sdiaz101

3:41 PM And another! This series may appeal to reluctant readers, particularly fans of Tom Angleberger’s “Origami Yoda” books.

mahnaz

3:41 PM shoutout to mark and sarah!!!!

dfarrell

3:41 PM :clap::clap:

librarygoddess67

3:41 PM Have to log-off. Didn’t get time to really participate b/c of these pesky patrons… Thanks! Love these interactive chats!

mahnaz

3:41 PM have a good one, @librarygoddess67 :simple_smile:

kparrott

3:41 PM Thanks for stopping in, @librarygoddess67

librarygoddess67

3:41 PM Thanks!!!

wr_cherry

3:42 PM Going to have to work on my verdicts much harder after reading those…

sdiaz101

3:42 PM We’re all learning!

alea_p

3:42 PM Same, @wr_cherry >.<

sdiaz101

3:42 PM Hey, and feel free to use Slack to chat with your fellow reviewers. For advice, etc

meganm

3:43 PM Logging off, thank you!

kparrott

3:43 PM They are new for us editors, too. Remember–SLJ only started them about a year or so ago.

3:43

Thanks for coming, @meganm

dfarrell

3:43 PM thank you! @meganm

sdiaz101

3:43 PM We have different channels on the left for specific reviewing areas, so feel free to join the ones that make the most sense for your!

3:43

you*

ilovespicturebooks

3:44 PM And you can always email your editor.

sdiaz101

3:44 PM And, if you’re ever struggling with a VERDICT, the editors are here to help

kparrott

3:44 PM Absolutely!

sdiaz101

3:45 PM I think people are slowly signing off, but if you ever have an idea for a future chat, please feel free to mention it here or email me directly

3:45

sdiaz@mediasourceinc.com

3:45

Or you can DM me via Slack as well

3:46

Unless anyone has some burning questions, we’ll be signing off!

mkozikowski

3:46 PM Thank you for a very useful discussion, love Slack.  Busy w/patron

nromanobraham

3:46 PM Thank you! I love this platform, by the way.

mdesharn

3:46 PM thank you!

alea_p

3:46 PM Thanks for all the suggestions!

kparrott

3:46 PM Thanks, everyone. Hugs and happy reading to all!

dfarrell

3:47 PM Thank you all for joining!

sljdvds

3:47 PM We’re all fine-tuning the verdicts. As @sdiaz101  mentioned, a good rule to remember is: Why should I buy this and who is this for?

wr_cherry

3:47 PM Really enjoyed this…very helpful

mahnaz

3:47 PM bye gang

jenna_friebel

3:47 PM Thanks! This was very useful.

wr_cherry

3:47 PM Bye all

hwrittsljatsullivan

3:47 PM Thank you all for the examples of stellar verdicts. Thanks again for these chats too.

sdiaz101

3:48 PM bye all! Have a good afternoon!

ilovespicturebooks

3:49 PM Thanks everyone. VERDICT Good, inspirational, and practical session for all audiences!

wadhambooks

3:50 PM Thanks to all of you SLJ folks!

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